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How not to ruin your period home with double glazing

How not to ruin your period home with double glazing

It can be difficult as a period-home-owner to strike the right balance between maintaining the classic beauty of your home's original features, whilst making sure that you don't get left behind when it comes to modern home-improving technologies – especially when those technologies can save you money. This is particularly true when it comes to windows. As period homes age, their windows can rot or warp, and owners often find themselves at a loss of how to deal with the issue. On top of that, there's the fact that newer window features, such as double glazing, tend to lead to bigger savings on energy and money, making them a very appealing replacement. But can you put double-glazed windows on a period house without ruining its old-fashioned charm? The simple answer is yes, you can. Get it right by following our top three tips below.

Get approval from your local council

Replacing any windows in a property now requires approval from your District Council, even if it's just a like-for-like replacement, so be sure to check what your options are if you're thinking about swapping your windows for some new ones. This is especially important if you're thinking about making changes to a period home, as there may be restrictions in place if it's a heritage property.
One advantage of changing your windows for double-glazed ones is that these are often more quickly approved than other types of windows, as they comply with the government's energy-saving initiatives. Furthermore, if you get double-glazed windows form a FENSA-regulated company, their work will come self-certified, meaning that you won't have to fill out a Building Notice application.

Match your new windows to your old ones

The key to success when replacing windows in a period home is to match the look of the originals as closely as possible. You might not think this will be possible with double-glazed windows, but you'll be surprised to find out how many different kinds there are available. You can now find double-glazed windows for sash and bay windows, with period features such as gold fretwork and stained glass.

Find a trusted installer

It’s best to leave the installation of your new windows to the supplier or one contracted by the manufacturer. The most important thing to do is check that the installer's brief includes 'making good' – that is, repairing any damage caused to the surrounding area during fitting. You should also make sure that any company you choose is approved by FENSA (the Fenestration Self-Assessment Scheme), which will also save you from filling out a Building Notice application.


Posted By:
Safestyle UK

23.09.2013

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